Dumb SEO Questions

(Entry was posted by Edwin Jonk on this post in the Dumb SEO Questions community on Facebook, Saturday, August 16, 2014).

Link Echoes, why Rankings Remain Even After Links Disappear

Link echo proven?

" This effect of these link tests, remaining in place long after the link had been removed, happened in every single link test we ran, of which I counted eight where I feel highly confident that there were no confounding variables, feeling really good that we followed a process kind of just like this. The links pointed, the ranking rose. The links disappeared, the ranking stayed high. "

Alistair Lattimore argues that this might be the reason why Google updated the best practise for domain migration. He makes two points:

1. " part of the role of the change of address tool is to stop inbound links to the original domain echoing and to expedite the equity shifting over to the new domain "

2. " Google have stated for a long time that once you`ve migrated to a new domain using 301 redirects and the redirects have been stable and in place for a few months that there is no requirement for the old domain to stay online. "

 
Link Echo Effect

Rand Fishkin published a Whiteboard Friday on the Moz blog about a behaviour known as link echos or link ghosts. In short, when a link to a page is removed from the internet - the page it was linking to doesn`t immediately fall in rankings as a result of the link being removed. I dropped some thoughts about this behaviour in a comment, let me know if you`ve got other ideas about this.?
Everyone knows what happens when a page earns new links from high-quality sites: Rankings improve. What happens when those links disappear, though? In today`s Whiteboard Friday, Rand explains that the answer isn`t what we might think.
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YOUR ANSWERS

Selected answers from the Dumb SEO Questions G+ community.

  • Edwin Jonk: <b>Link echo proven?</b>

    &quot; This effect of these link tests, remaining in place long after the link had been removed, happened in every single link test we ran, of which I counted eight where I feel highly confident that there were no confounding variables, feeling really good that we followed a process kind of just like this. The links pointed, the ranking rose. The links disappeared, the ranking stayed high. &quot;

     ;argues that this might be the reason why Google updated the best practise for domain migration. He makes two points:

    1. &quot; part of the role of the change of address tool is to stop inbound links to the original domain echoing and to expedite the equity shifting over to the new domain &quot;

    2. &quot; Google have stated for a long time that once you&#39;ve migrated to a new domain using 301 redirects and the redirects have been stable and in place for a few months that there is no requirement for the old domain to stay online. &quot;
  • Alistair Lattimore: <b>Link Echo Effect</b>

     ;published a Whiteboard Friday on the  ;blog about a behaviour known as link echos or link ghosts. In short, when a link to a page is removed from the internet - the page it was linking to doesn&#39;t immediately fall in rankings as a result of the link being removed. I dropped some thoughts about this behaviour in a comment, let me know if you&#39;ve got other ideas about this.

View original question in the Dumb SEO Questions community on Facebook, Saturday, August 16, 2014).

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